“I tried to divine which day the world became theirs.”

english_passengersThe Brown Baggers Book group read English Passengers by Matthew Kneale and met on February 16 to discuss it. There were mixed reviews among the book club members.

English Passengers was shortlisted for the Booker Prize for Fiction, won the 2000 Whitbread Book of the Year Award, the Australian Miles Franklin Award, and France’s Relay Prix d’Evasion.

This book is a historical novel set during the age of British colonialism and is told by about 20 different narrators. The story spans decades and follows two timelines, 30 years apart. In one storyline, a Manx captain and his band of rum smugglers have a difficult time off-loading their merchandise and end up becoming a passenger ship in order to pay fines imposed on them by British customs officials. Their passengers included a reverend who believed the Garden of Eden is located in Tasmania, a botanist, and a doctor who had sketchy views about the different races of men.

The book also followed the storyline of Peevay, a Tasmanian Aborigine, who was half-aborigine and half-white. The beginning of Peevay’s story was the time period when the British invaded Tasmania and started to decimate the Aboriginal population. The reader learns through Peevay what atrocities the Aborigines experienced at the hands of the British settlers. The two stories and timelines meet up when the Manx ship finally makes it to Tasmania.

Peevay was a favorite character of the book group. Book club members noted that Peevay’s narration had the best language and descriptions of events and really engaged the reader. Other members also enjoyed reading the captain’s storyline and how he managed his interesting passengers.

Other Information
About the author:
http://www.matthewkneale.net/

Reviews of the book:
From the New York Times
From BookPage
From Publisher’s Weekly

Similar Reads:
Study in Scarlet by Arthur Conan Doyle
Great Expectations by Charles Dickens
Morality Play by Barry Unsworth
Quarantine by Jim Crace

More Information about the history of Australia:
From the Australian Government
About British convicts who were sent to Australia
About Indigenous Australians

Join the Brown Baggers next month on Thursday, March 16 at noon for Silver Sparrow, the NEA Big Read 2017 selection.

For the Love of Reading

amialonehere

An avid reader is always searching for their next conquest. What better genre could there be for a lover of reading to peruse than books about books? Check out these “bibliobooks” from your local library for further investigation into the beloved pastime of reading:

Am I Alone Here?: Notes on Living to Read and Reading to Live by Peter Orner – A collection of 41 short essays about reading and life reflects the acclaimed writer’s beliefs about the role of stories in shaping his identity and includes entries on the censoring of the works of Isaac Babel and Zora Neale Hurston, the paradoxical loneliness of Franz Kafka and the dubious insanity of Robert Walser.

 

The Literature Book edited by James Canton – A global assessment of the forefront works of literature and the themes that unite them is presented through a collection of 100 articles, infographics, photographs and author biographies and is complemented by suggestions for additional reading.

The Books That Changed My Life edited by Bethanne Patrick – Including contributions from Al Roker, Carl Hiaasen, Gillian Flynn, Liev Schreiber, Tim Gunn, Margaret Atwood, Mayim Bialik and many others, 100 of today’s most prominent literary and cultural icons share the books that changed their life, why they love them and their passion with readers everywhere.

Browsings: A Year of Reading, Collecting, and Living With Books by Michael Dirda – A latest volume of writings by the Pulitzer Prize-winning critic and Washington Post columnist shares personal essays on diverse topics ranging from literary pets and cursive writing to book inscriptions and the pleasures of science-fiction conventions. Continue reading

Sing your way to early literacy

By Camille Thompson and Jacqui Dempsey-Cohen

This month, we’re celebrating early literacy with our Winter Reading activities for children birth-age 5.  Early literacy skills are the building blocks children acquire before they learn to read and write which help them on their journey towards literacy.  One of the ways caregivers can help children develop early literacy skills is through singing.  Singing, reciting nursery rhymes, and reading books with rhyming phrases helps children hear the smaller sounds in words, which will help them sound out words when they learn to read.  You don’t need to be a virtuoso to sing with your child– whether you can carry a tune or not, you and your child will reap the benefits of singing for early literacy, all while having fun together!  Try out more fun activities from our Winter Reading Activity Sheet, and once you’ve completed it, turn it in to any JMRL location for a free book.

These books are wonderful for rhyming and singing with your child:

Every Little Thing by Cedella Marley: An exuberant picture book adaptation of Bob Marley’s song that illustrates the reassuring story of a bouncing, dreadlocked boy who won’t let anything get him down.

Twinkle, Twinkle Little Star by Jerry Pinkney: A lavish rendition of the classic song following the adventures of a curious chipmunk who embarks on an imaginary voyage to the stars.

Barnyard Dance by Sandra Boynton: Adorably silly farm animals dance and prance across board book pages in a frolicking read-aloud with foot-stomping rhythms and rhymes.

Goodnight Songs by Margaret Wise Brown: A collection of charming lullabies by the celebrated  author of Goodnight Moon, illustrated by 12 award winning artists.

Baa Baa Black Sheep by Jane Cabrera: Black sheep graciously offers bag after bag of wool to Miss, who hand-knits mittens, a tea cozy, and other fuzzy gifts for her friends. Includes music for piano and guitar.

Inch by Inch by David Mallett: Inch by inch and row by row, a boy and his dog help their garden grow in this playfully illustrated version of the classic song.

Seals on the Bus by Lenny Hort: What will the people on the bus do when raucous animals hop on board and add their voices to the din? This beastly twist on a favorite song will have young readers errping and roaring and honking along.

I Went Walking by Sue Williams: A melodious guessing-game concept book in which a shock-headed child goes for a walk and collects a procession of surprisingly colorful animals.