“I never understood why people thought my color, any color, needed fixing.”

On June 18th, the Central Library Brown Baggers book group met virtually to discuss
The Book Woman of Troublesome Creek by Kim Michele Richardson.  

The Brown Baggers took time to bid a fond farewell to librarian Katie Gorrell, as this was her last meeting as a facilitator as she moves on to other things back in her home state of Pennsylvania.

A work of historical fiction, the book tells the story of the WPA Pack Horse Library Project through the experiences of Mary Cussy Carter, one of the last of  the Blue People of Kentucky and a packhorse librarian. Because of her blue skin, Mary suffered discrimination from the community just as her African American friend (and co-librarian) Queenie did.  The local doctor convinces Mary to subject herself to hospitalization and testing to “cure” her of her blue skin.

Most readers were not aware of the Blue People of Kentucky.  Originally from France, these descendants of the Fugate family had a hereditary condition called methemoglobinemia  that caused their skin to have a bluish tint. This led to discussion of how skin color and other outward-presenting markers can form identity just as much as invisible things can, and how removing appearance is a form of erasing identity.

When the group chose and scheduled this title, we of course had no idea that it would be so timely with the Black Lives Matter protests and ongoing current coverage of the history of racial disparities in the US.

Several Brown Baggers expressed surprise at the violence of some scenes of the book, and the threats of attack or mistreatment against the main character. There was much conversation around the tone of the book, with some praising the happy ending, and others condemning it as unrealistic when compared to the rest of the book. Some readers also found the “love interest” element wrapped up a little too early.

 A story of poverty, prejudice and isolation, as well as the power of literature. In the end, most of the Brown Baggers agreed it was a good read, and the overuse of expository writing actually helped keep their interest, as the setting of the book is one not often seen on the page.

The Brown Baggers will meet again virtually on July 16th to discuss Dispatches from Pluto by Richard Grant. Please email kfarrell@jmrl.org for details on how to participate from your computer or phone.

Books mentioned :

The Giver of Stars by Jojo Moyes

Links:

Horse-Riding Librarians Were the Great Depressions Bookmobiles – from Smithsonian

University of Kentucky’s Packhorse Librarian Presentation (great photos!)

Interview with Kim Michelle Richardson from LA Public Library

The Brown Baggers will meet again virtually on July 16th to discuss Dispatches from Pluto by Richard Grant. Please email kfarrell@jmrl.org for details on how to participate from your computer or phone.

2 thoughts on ““I never understood why people thought my color, any color, needed fixing.”

  1. Krista, I always pay attention to what the Brown Baggers are reading or have read. I thought the book, The Book Woman of Troublesome Creek might be one I’d like to read. Being a person of color, the comment, “I never understood why people thought my color, any color, needed fixing” stood out to me. The book did seem very timely for the turbulent times we’re experiencing now. I must ask, were there any African Americans in this group discussion? I only ask because sometimes the feelings brought on by the previous quote is sometimes not completely understood by those who are NOT considered different by some. I guess since I have’t read the book, I cannot comment further. I do want to read this book. Maybe when the world is right side up again, I can join the group. I look forward to reading some of your books for discussion.

    • Hi Shirley-
      Nice to hear from you and I’m glad you follow along with what the Brown Baggers are discussing. The quote is from the book, the main character, speaking about her blue skin.
      She was frustrated that the Dr. wanted to try experiments to change her skin tone and was also tired of her community treating her differently because of her color. Yes, there was an African American participating in this discussion. I do hope you’ll read the book and I’d love to hear what you think of it. Hope you can join us someday!

      Take care-
      Krista

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