How-To Festival 2018

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JMRL is hosting its 2nd Annual How-To Festival on May 5 from 10am-2pm at the Central Library. Learn a variety of subjects in 30 minute or less. This schedule is being finalized. The details below will reflect changes to the schedule as they are made.

10am

10:30am

  • How To Design Videos On Your Phone with Creative Might (Madison Room)
  • How To Sharpen Knives (McIntire Room)
  • How To Use Virtual Reality with Albemarle County Public Schools staff (McIntire Room)
  • How To Improve Energy Efficiency with LEAP (Jefferson Room)
  • How To Use Resources for the Public at UVA with the UVA Library staff (Main Floor)

11am

11:30am

  • How To Do Citizen-based Photojournalism with Jason Lappa (McIntire Room)
  • How To Perform a Tea Ceremony with The Radiant Leaf (Jefferson Room)
  • How To 3D Design with library staff (Madison Room)

12pm

12:30pm

  • How To Sew with Cville TimeBank (McIntire Room)
  • How To Play North Indian Classical Music with SPICMACAY (McIntire Room)
  • How To Audition for a Play with Miller Susen (Madison Room)
  • How To Draw In 3D with library staff (Main Floor)
  • How To Repair a Bike with Community Bikes (Outside)

1pm

  • How To Be a Birder with Jim Nix (Jefferson Room)
  • How To Cross Stitch with library staff (Main Floor)
  • How To make a silhouette portrait with library staff (Madison Room)

1:30pm

  • How To Make Gelato with Splendora’s Gelato (Madison Room)
  • How To Podcast with library staff (Main Floor)

From 10am-2pm we will also feature:

  • How To participate in summer reading
  • How To get the most out of the library (learn about tech & other non-book items to check out)
  • How To use the bookmobile
  • How To put out a fire with the Charlottesville Fire Department (with a truck!)
  • How To join and support the Friends of the Library AND a mini book sale
  • How To 3D print
  • and FREE COMIC BOOK DAY!

Hope to see you there!

Finance Apps

This week, April 21-28, is Money Smart Week and it is a great time to give your financial skills a boost with one of these helpful free apps.

mint

Mint (available on iOS and Android) is a great app for overall money management of your spending, bills, and account balances.


dollarbird

Dollarbird (available on iOS and Android) is great if you prefer to plot your finances out on a calendar.


goodbudget

 Good Budget (available on iOS and Android) is useful if you like to budget using the envelope method.


clarity

Clarity Money (available on iOS and Android) is also an excellent budgeting app choice.


acorns

Acorns (available on iOS and Android) lets you invest small amounts on an ongoing basis if you want a simple way to begin investing.


digit

Digit (available on iOS and Android) will help you save by monitoring your accounts to see what “extra” money is usually there and not being spent and transfer it to a savings account.


splitwise

Splitwise (available on iOS and Android) lets you divvy up costs between friends, family, or roommates overtime so you can reimburse them in larger chunks.


bstow

Bstow (available on iOS and Android) helps you help others by rounding up your purchase amounts and donating the change to a charity of your choice.


If these aren’t enough or you’d rather up your financial IQ before downloading try this free Smart About Money course.

 

“More subtle than Kingsolver.”

ragnarokBooks on Tap read Ragnarok (other editions available) by A.S. Byatt at Champion Brewery on April 5. The book is part of the Canongate Myth Series, in which noted authors reinterpret myths in book-length format. Last fall the group read and enjoyed Margaret Atwood’s contribution, The Penelopiad, so we decided to try another one. A.S. Byatt chose Ragnarok, the Norse myth of a battle of the gods leading to the end of the world. She frames the story with that of the thin girl evacuated to the British countryside during World War II who comforts herself by reading and re-reading 19th century German collection of Norse myths. The destruction of the mythic world and  20th century Europe are compared in the final section, “Thoughts on Myths” with environmental degradation in the 21st century.

Unlike The Penelopiad which was a witty transformation of The Odyssey focusing on a minor character, Byatt’s Ragnarok is a straight-forward retelling within the frame story. Some of our readers found the writing, naming all plants and animals, lush, similar to The Ten Thousand Things. Others found it off-putting and hard to track.

Byatt questions the difference between myth and fairy tale but does not provide a clear answer. Our group was also unable to come up with a definitive answer, but did find this myth useful. Are we not as vainglorious as the gods? Is Loki’s chaos as natural state destined to bring about cyclical cataclysm, either war or environmental? Unlike modern interpretations of fairy tales, Byatt chose the pre-Christian ending, in which the world is destroyed but not re-born. However, there are glimpses of hope in her final section and in the fact that the thin girl’s father unexpectedly returns from war.

While this wasn’t the success that The Penelopiad was, the readers who joined us found it a worthwhile struggle and the first (and probably only) book by Byatt that we’ll read.

More Information:
About the author
Interview with the author about the book
Other works

Books on Tap Information:

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