Come to the How-To Festival!

The How-To Festival is BACK for its 4th annual library takeover event this Saturday, May 14th, from 10-1. Join us at Central Library in downtown Charlottesville (201 E Market St, Charlottesville, VA 22902) for a fun, free, fast-paced learning event. You do not need to sign up or register to attend; stop by for one presentation, or hang out for all three hours! There will be a variety of demos, workshops, and presentations happening every half hour. If you have any questions about the event, please email reference@jmrl.org.

SCHEDULE

KEY: HOW-TO PRESENTATION / Presenting Group: Location

ALL DAY:

3D PRINT, MEET YOUR LIBRARY, DOWNLOADABLES, BOOKFACE/ JMRL: 3rd Floor elevator lobby

FIRE TRUCK TOURS/ Charlottesville Fire Department: Outside

FRIENDS OF JMRL MINI BOOK SALE: Outside

10:00

CELLO, VIOLIN + DRUM/ Cville Symphony: Jefferson

MEND CLOTHES/ Cville Timebank: Swanson

SUPPORT SURVIVORS + SELF CARE/ SARA: Swanson

YARN FROM PLASTIC BAGS/ Nealand Farm: Swanson

BORROW TOOLS FOR FREE/ Cville Tool Library: Outside

USE NATIVE PLANTS/ RMN: Outside

10:30

CELLO, VIOLIN + DRUM/ Cville Symphony: Jefferson

COSPLAY MAKEUP/ JMRL: Swanson

CANNABIS 101/ Albemarle Cannabis Co: Swanson

QIGONG/ Mindful Tai Ji: Outside

IDENTIFY GARDEN PESTS/ RMN: Outside

AFRICAN DRUMMING/ Cville Drum Choir: Outside

11:00

CELLO, VIOLIN + DRUM/ Cville Symphony: Jefferson

PRINT ON SMALL PRESSES/ VA Humanities: Swanson

HAPPY HOUSEPLANTS/ JMRL: Swanson

FOSTER POSITIVE IDENTITY/ CAFF: Swanson

COOK W/ WATER/ Culinary Concepts AB: Swanson

TUNE A GUITAR + MUSIC THEORY/ R. Dennis: Swanson

CHAIR YOGA/ SimplyYOGA: Main Floor Fiction Stacks

COMPOST/ Black Bear Composting: Outside

LITERACY TUTOR/ Literacy Volunteers: Outside

BOOKMOBILE TOURS: Outside

11:30

CELLO, VIOLIN + DRUM/ Cville Symphony: Jefferson

PRINT ON SMALL PRESSES/ VA Humanities: Swanson

REDUCE CARBON FTPRINT/ C3: Swanson

PERSONAL BOUNDARIES/ SHE: Swanson

HOME DNA TESTS/ Watershed DNA: Swanson

SELF-DEFENSE/ Cville Sheriff’s Office: Outside

WOODWORKING/ Judy Cahill: Outside

BOOKMOBILE TOURS: Outside

12:00

PRINT ON SMALL PRESSES/ VA Humanities: Swanson

SPANISH RESOURCES FOR ABUSE/ SHE: Swanson

ESSENTIAL OILS/ Flourish Essential Oils: Swanson

MAKE A FAMILY MEDIA PLAN/ ACPS: Swanson

WOODWORKING/ Judy Cahill: Outside

ELECTRIC BIKES HOW + WHY: Outside

BOOKMOBILE TOURS: Outside

12:30

FIND COMMON GROUND/ One Small Step: Swanson

SELF MASSAGE FOR HANDS, ARMS + FEET/ Exhortation Therapeutic Touch: Swanson

FLAMENCO DANCE/ Maria Flamenco: Swanson

VIRTUAL REALITY/ ACPS: Swanson

WOODWORKING/ Judy Cahill: Outside

ELECTRIC BIKES HOW + WHY: Outside

BOOKMOBILE TOURS: Outside

Many Thanks to the 2022 Presenters!

Albemarle Cannabis Company

Albemarle County Public Schools (ACPS)

Black Bear Composting

Judy Cahill

Joshua Carp

Center for the Book, Virginia Humanities

Charlottesville Fire Department

Charlottesville Sheriff’s Office

Charlottesville Symphony

Community Attention Foster Families (CAFF)

Community Climate Collaborative (C3)

Culinary Concepts AB

Cville Drum Choir

Cville Timebank/Repair Cafe

Cville Tool Library

Ryan Dennis

Exhortation Therapeutic Touch

Flourish Essential Oils

Friends of JMRL

JMRL Bookmobile

Literacy Volunteers

Maria Flamenco

Mindful Tai Ji

Nealand Farm

One Small Step @ UVA

Rivanna Master Naturalists (RMN)

Sexual Assault Resource Agency (SARA)

Shelter for Help in Emergency (SHE)

Simply YOGA

Watershed DNA

JMRL extends hours and building options – Tier 2

The Jefferson-Madison Regional Library will be extending hours and in-building options at many of its locations starting Monday, May 17. Appointments will no longer be necessary, and contactless curbside/drive-up options for materials pick-up will continue at all locations.

As part of the move to Tier 2 of JMRL’s COVID-19 response plan, there will be capacity and visit time limits at all branches and all programs and events will remain virtual. The Bookmobile will be offering limited services.

Patrons are encouraged to limit their visit to two hours and will be required to wear masks and abide by social distancing guidelines inside library buildings.

According to JMRL Director David Plunkett, “The last few months of Tier 3 appointment services have been tremendously busy at JMRL. The people of Albemarle, Charlottesville, Greene, Louisa, and Nelson place a very high value on their library service, and JMRL is glad to be able to safely offer more options for access in Tier 2.”

Public computer use and self-serve printing will be available.

No food or drink will be allowed in the library and patrons should continue to use book drops to return books.

For details about your library branch and its services, please visit jmrl.org

2021 JMRL-WriterHouse Poetry Contest

2021 JMRL-WriterHouse Poetry Contest

The challenges surrounding the current pandemic may have continued into 2021, but JMRL and WriterHouse were very happy to once again offer the annual Poetry Contest for Adults this past March, which took place for the sixth time this year.  

A team of judges selected finalists from all the entries, which were then judged by the esteemed Luisa Igloria, Poet Laureate of Virginia and Professor of Creative Writing and English at Old Dominion University. We are pleased to announce the winner and runner-up here and share their words for others to enjoy.

The winning entry was “Carolina Wrens,” written by poet Mary McCue, who will receive the prize of a $200 Visa gift card. Poet Laura Wallace was chosen as the runner-up, for her work “Aphasia”; she receives the prize of a $100 Visa gift card. Luisa Igloria had the following to say about the selections:

“Carolina Wrens”

The poet observes such a careful economy of language and image in this poem, yet doesn’t sacrifice any generosity of attention. Birds call through the branches with “voices so clear and bright” as if to illustrate the promise of persistence. But the season might have arrived too early for nesting, for “song and intent.” At the end of the day, there are only “feathers and chips of bone” on the porch. “Living alone, one can believe anything,” says the speaker; but though the world might not exactly last, at least there are these small returns. 

“Aphasia”

What would we do with no access to even the most ordinary of words, without the ability to communicate in speech? In “Aphasia,” the poet captures a beloved’s struggle with a disorder which has damaged their ability to process language. Though the faltering brain can still “illuminate a scan,” there is such ache and yearning here along with the hope that “you will remember … one morning/ just in time.”   

Please consider these comments as you read the poems below (note: formatting attempts were made to be as close to the original as possible):

“Carolina Wrens” by Mary McCue,
Winner

What they are saying this morning
of dew fresh grass
I do not know,

but I understand happiness
as the pair flutters 
in and out of Stewartia branches—

voices so clear and bright
I’d swear the tiny white petals
opened a month early.

Hidden in a fork of the tree,
a thatched pagoda-like house,
leaves, twigs and milkweed silk
spilling from its lip.

For weeks I’ve admired the diligence
of these shy birds hopping from bush pile
to nest and felt blessed
by song and intent.

Living alone, one can believe anything.
I believed they belonged forever
like the morning glories
of blue, dark blue and rose,

those delicate climbers
that appear every spring
wrap themselves around
a reed, a pole.

But hours later, on a porch step,
only feathers and chips of bone.

“Aphasia” by Laura Wallace,
Runner-Up

One morning a ragged fingernail scratches 
deep within the brain a soft and lonely itch. 

A yearning not to speak, not to need so strongly 
to be heard or to divine the word that will relieve all 
hunger, quell all war and cruelty, slake a planet’s 
thirst for peace and oxygen, oxygen and peace. 

This changes to desire for tea, just tea, it’s what you always do 
but you can’t recall what tea is called, its early-morning sound or 
meaning, in which disorderly cabinet it waits or how it’s made. 
Instead you head again to bed and start to write until you read 
what you have typed and it 
is gibberish. 

The smart and urgent residents prick and quiz religiously until you 
finally reply in ways that mean as much to them as once had meant 
to you: the will-yous, won’t-yous, can-yous, can’t-yous collected 
over time before you learned this day that all a human needs when 
questions come is yes or no. DNR? Okay? 

They let you sleep or make you sleep and later on illuminate a scan. 
A white spot sends out a beam from the sly cupboard where tea lives, 
where words are stored in wild and looping canyons full of tiny jars 
with golden lids and colors fragrant as continents of flowers. 

You’d had no idea, really none, how a pilot might require 
such skill and concentration. 

You find no secret speech on peace or Paris or the planet but 
when they say the stroke was small you can still go, joy roars 
in your chest as loudly as the engines making snaking, filthy 
trails that fall away below your feet. And though you know 
there might be a word like love you’ve overlooked, you hope 
you will remember it one morning 
just in time.

Thank you to all the entrants for participating in the contest, and congratulations once again to the winners!