“Edison gets the audience. Westinghouse gets the excellence. Tesla gets the ideas.”

lastdaysofnightThe Brown Bagger’s discussed Academy-Award winning author Graham Moore’s second novel, The Last Days of Night on November 16. The historical-fiction centered on the light bulb rivalry between inventors George Westinghouse and Thomas Edison. Of course Nikola Tesla had a role in this war of currents, but the novel followed Westinghouse’s young lawyer, Paul Cravath, and his quest to win an impossible lawsuit against Thomas Edison.

Both Westinghouse and Edison wanted their current to provide electricity to America- Edison tried to discredit Westinghouse’s Alternating Current by saying it was dangerous, so that he could supply America with his Direct Current. However, it was proven that A/C current was safer than D/C current. The story itself followed the actual war of currents, in a more compressed time frame. The characters in the story were well-developed- Edison was portrayed as a man who was only interested in name recognition, which he achieved, even at the loss of the company he started. Westinghouse was depicted in a kinder manner, and as someone who wanted to make the best products possible. And, Tesla was portrayed as an eccentric genius who just wanted to invent and did not care about money.

Paul Cravath was fresh out of law school when he took this case, and while he was smart, he was inexperienced and made some mistakes. However, by taking Westinghouse as a client he was introduced to the more glamorous side of New York and meets Agnes Huntington, an opera singer with a mysterious past. Cravath had to take continually bigger risks throughout the lawsuit but doing so meant that he would change as a person, and possibly lose those that he cared about.

The Brown Baggers overwhelmingly loved this novel! Many felt that the book provided a great background on the history of light bulbs and the nuances of patents. The quotes at the beginning of each chapter made the content even more relevant for today’s world and most agreed that the writing was very descriptive- almost as if it were a screenplay. There was a lot of legalese in the book, but not so much that it was hard to follow. Many felt that the novel was both emotional and fascinating- it was a page turner!

Reviews of the novel:
New York Times Book Review
Washington Post

Interview with the author:
NPR

Books mentioned during the discussion:
The Riverkeepers by John Cronin and Robert F. Kennedy
Thomas A. Edison, Young Inventor by Sue Guthridge

The Brown Baggers will meet again on December 21 at 12pm to select titles for the next 12 months- bring a treat to share and participate in the *book swap (new this year) if you want!

*Book swap- bring a book or two to trade- any leftover books will be donated to the Friends of the Library Booksale.

“You only need one ray of light to chase all the shadows away.”

18774964Brown Baggers met on October 20 to discuss Fredrik Backman’s wildly popular debut novel A Man Called Ove. The book follows a recently widowed and retired 59-year-old man who is a bit of a curmudgeon while he figures out what to do next with his life. It has sold nearly three million copies worldwide.

Most readers enjoyed Ove and his adventures. While some felt the character was too curmudgeonly, most liked his bad attitude and after a discussion, decided he might fall somewhere on the autism spectrum and be a bit OCD.

Readers thought this book was poignant, and said it had them laughing and crying at the same time — a rare occurrence when reading a novel. 

They mused over Sonja’s motivations in marrying such a thorny character as Ove. Maybe she liked how odd he was. But most decided she needed to be needed as completely as Ove needed her. This was also reflected in the career she chose, as a teacher for difficult and special needs children.

The novel skips around in time, but it didn’t bother readers. They enjoyed how the author used this device to set up his big reveals and slowly unfurl Ove’s backstory.

Readers who had seen the movie adaptation felt it was remarkably well done and approved of the casting. News had recently been released that Tom Hanks would play Ove in the American adaptation, which stirred more discussion from the group.

More Information:
Author Bio
Interview with author
Other works by author
Swedish film adaptation

Other Titles Mentioned:
The Rosie Project by Graeme Simsion
An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge by Ambrose Bierce

Brown Baggers will meet next on Thursday, November 16th at noon to discuss Last Days of Night by Graham Moore. The following meeting will be on December 21st at noon to select books for the next 12 months. Join us for a holiday potluck and some lively voting.