America Saves Week

This last week of February is designated by the personal finance community as America Saves Week. They use this week to encourage you to improve your money saving behaviors and increase your savings amounts. While there are plenty of great articles that cover this topic, you might want something more in depth. Here are some of the many books we have on managing your money:

7 Money Rules for Life: How To Take Control of Your Financial Future by Mary Hunt.

Financial Fresh Start: Your Five-step Plan for Adapting and Prospering in the New Economy by Shari Olefson.

Financially Fearless: the LearnVest Program for Taking Control of Your Money by Alexa Von Tobel.

Frugal Isn’t Cheap: Spend Less, Save More, and Live Better by Clare K. Levison, CPA.

Living Well, Spending Less: 12 Secrets of the Good Life by Ruth Soukup.

The One-page Financial Plan: a Simple Way To Be Smart About Your Money by Carl Richards.

Personal Finance for Dummies by Eric Tyson, MBA.

Picture Your Prosperity: Smart Money Moves to Turn Your Vision into Reality by Ellen Rogin, CPA, CFP & Lisa Kueng.

Pogue’s Basics: Money: Essential Tips and Shortcuts (That No One Bothers to Tell You) About Beating the System by David Pogue.

The Recovering Spender : How to Live a Happy, Fulfilled, Debt-free Life by Lauren Greutman.

Whether it is cutting out one coffee a week or canceling cable, check out the savings tips in these books to help you add a little more to your emergency fund, rainy day fund, or retirement fund this year.

“I tried to divine which day the world became theirs.”

english_passengersThe Brown Baggers Book group read English Passengers by Matthew Kneale and met on February 16 to discuss it. There were mixed reviews among the book club members.

English Passengers was shortlisted for the Booker Prize for Fiction, won the 2000 Whitbread Book of the Year Award, the Australian Miles Franklin Award, and France’s Relay Prix d’Evasion.

This book is a historical novel set during the age of British colonialism and is told by about 20 different narrators. The story spans decades and follows two timelines, 30 years apart. In one storyline, a Manx captain and his band of rum smugglers have a difficult time off-loading their merchandise and end up becoming a passenger ship in order to pay fines imposed on them by British customs officials. Their passengers included a reverend who believed the Garden of Eden is located in Tasmania, a botanist, and a doctor who had sketchy views about the different races of men.

The book also followed the storyline of Peevay, a Tasmanian Aborigine, who was half-aborigine and half-white. The beginning of Peevay’s story was the time period when the British invaded Tasmania and started to decimate the Aboriginal population. The reader learns through Peevay what atrocities the Aborigines experienced at the hands of the British settlers. The two stories and timelines meet up when the Manx ship finally makes it to Tasmania.

Peevay was a favorite character of the book group. Book club members noted that Peevay’s narration had the best language and descriptions of events and really engaged the reader. Other members also enjoyed reading the captain’s storyline and how he managed his interesting passengers.

Other Information
About the author:
http://www.matthewkneale.net/

Reviews of the book:
From the New York Times
From BookPage
From Publisher’s Weekly

Similar Reads:
Study in Scarlet by Arthur Conan Doyle
Great Expectations by Charles Dickens
Morality Play by Barry Unsworth
Quarantine by Jim Crace

More Information about the history of Australia:
From the Australian Government
About British convicts who were sent to Australia
About Indigenous Australians

Join the Brown Baggers next month on Thursday, March 16 at noon for Silver Sparrow, the NEA Big Read 2017 selection.