Welcoming Week at JMRL

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Welcoming Week is September 14-23 and JMRL has activities planned for all ages! During this annual series of events, communities bring together immigrants, refugees, and native-born residents to raise awareness of the benefits of welcoming everyone to our community.

The purpose of Welcoming Week to to reach across the community to reduce the barriers that immigrants face to fully participating in the community. It also serves to build bridges between newcomers and long-time residents. Last year there were over 700 Welcoming Week events across the country. Here are the events planned for our area:

Programs at the Central Library:
Lunchtime Presentation by the IRC
Friday, September 14 at 11:30am
Learn about the services the International Rescue Committee (IRC) provides to refugees in the Charlottesville area.

All Kinds of Families Storytime
Saturday, September 15 at 10:30am
This special Storytime is offered in partnership with the Charlottesville Pride Festival. Celebrate the beautiful diversity in all of our families with stories, songs, and dance. Create a rainbow craft that you can take to the Festival where you can add more decorations. Best for families with children ages 7 and under, but everyone is welcome.

Where I’m From Bookmaking
Monday, September 17 at 6pm
Explore your roots and poetic abilities using a template inspired by George Ella Lyon’s poem “Where I’m From.” Create a keepsake accordion book to preserve your words. Ages 14+.
Register here.

Mehndi Workshop
Tuesday, September 18 at 6pm
Mehndi is a form of body art in which decorative designs are applied on skin using a paste created from the powdered dry leaves of the henna plant. Come learn about the origins of this art form from ancient India and witness the preparation of henna paste. The program concludes with an opportunity to create lovely henna tattoos and sends you off with safety and care instructions. Ages 14+.
Register here.

The Good Lie (2014)
Sunday, September 23 at 1:30pm
A group of Sudanese refugees given the chance to resettle in America arrive in Kansas City, Missouri, where their encounter with an employment agency counselor forever changes all of their lives. The film will be followed by a speaker. In partnership with the Girl Scouts. Rated PG-13.

Programs at the Northside Library:
Here I Am with Terry Samala de Guzman
Friday, September 14 at 1:30pm
Life coach and former COO of Chicago’s Museum of Contemporary Art, Terry de Guzman, shares her story and life tenets – insights that carried her through a complicated childhood, immigrating from the Philippines, overcoming personal and professional challenges, to build a successful career and a fulfilling life. Books available for purchase and on sale at New Dominion Bookshop.

Laughing Dragon Kung Fu (CANCELED)
Friday, September 14 at 4pm
Join us as Laughing Dragon Kung Fu presents a traditional Chinese dragon dance followed by a traditional southern Chinese lion dance.

Around the World Storytime and Crafts
Saturday, September 15 at 10:30am
Join us for a whirlwind trip around the world with stories and crafts for school-aged children. Ages 5-11.

Bollywood Fitness with Kumud Vanderveer
Saturday, September 15 at 2pm
A Bollywood dance-fitness program combining dance choreography and the music from Bollywood. This 45-minute cardio workout between changing intensity dance sequences will get you moving, sweating and feeling good. Burn calories, release stress hormones, all while having fun! No prior dance experience required. Dress comfortably. Please check with your physician for any medical conditions before registering. Ages 18+. Required Registration begins August 25.
Register here.

Telling Our Stories
Monday, September 17 at 6:30pm
Hear students working with the Thomas Jefferson Adult and Career Education (TJACE) tell their personal stories. Refreshments will be served at the conclusion of the program.

Coco (2017)
Tuesday, September 18 at 6:30pm
A boy journeys into the Land of the Dead to seek forgiveness from his ancestors and lift a curse. Refreshments served. Rated PG.

Spotlight on Immigration
Tuesday, September 18 at 6:30-8:45pm
Deena Sharuk from the Legal Aid Justice Center will discuss immigration law prior to a screening of the documentary Who is Dayani Cristal?: the story of a migrant who found himself in the deadly stretch of desert known as “the corridor of death.”

The Music of Appalachia: A Global History
Thursday, September 20 at 6:30-8pm
Join Emily Morrison, founder of Charlottesville’s roots music school The Front Porch as she discusses the roots of Appalachian Music traversing numerous continents and cultures. Hear guest artists play folk instruments from all over the world, and maybe get a chance to try one yourself! Be amazed at the diverse influences and extraordinary sounds influencing much of today’s modern music.

Arabic Calligraphy   
Saturday, September 22 at 10:30am
Celebrate Welcoming Week and learn about the art of calligraphy. Hafidha Bouzidi and Mouadh Benamar from the Islamic Society of Central Virginia will teach the class. All supplies provided. Required registration begins September 1.
Register here.

Won’t You Be My Neighbor? (2018)   
Saturday, September 22 at 2pm
Filmmaker Morgan Neville examines the life and legacy of Fred Rogers, the beloved host of the popular children’s TV show “Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood.” Rated PG-13.

Programs at other branches:
Crozet Library
U.S. Immigration: An Overview
Monday, September 17 at 6:30pm
How has the U.S. immigrant population changed over time? Presentation and discussion by Alyson Ball, member of humanitarian group Green Valley-Sahuarita Samaritans in Arizona and of the Charlottesville area International Rescue Committee.

Gordon Ave Library
Bilingual Storytime: La hora de los cuentos
Tuesday, September 18 at 3pm
Enjoy listening to favorite stories, rhymes and songs in both Spanish and English during this special bilingual storytime.
Register here.

Visit wgcville.org for events happening around the City of Charlottesville.

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Crafting at the Library

Crafts aren’t just for kids! An article from Neurology, a journal published by the American Academy of Neurology, states that older adults who participate in creative activities, such as crafts, could delay the development of memory problems. Crafting also allows you to develop new skills and can give you the opportunity to do something a little bit different. All great reasons to make a craft!

Below is a craft that we recently made at the Louisa County Library. Try making this paper rosette wreath at home:

Supplies needed:
Paper, cut into 1.5” x 12” strips (thicker paper, such as scrapbooking paper, works best)
Glue gun (plus extra glue sticks)
Cardboard form (cut out a 12” circle from a piece of cardboard)
Scissors, ruler, scrap paper
Optional: 1” circles or other shapes, ribbon

Step 1:
Fold your strip like an accordion using 1/4” folds. You might want to score your lines with a ruler first if you have trouble making small, even folds. You’ll need about 11 pieces of paper, more if you want to overlap your rosettes.

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Step 2:
Join the ends of the folded paper and secure with glue or tape to form a cylinder.

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Step 3:
Gather the folds on one end of the cylinder and gently press down—don’t worry if you have to gently reshape your cylinder as you go. As you press down, the shape of the rosette will begin to form.

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Use hot glue and a small piece of scrap paper to secure it at the center of the plain side of the rosette. The scrap paper will create a flat surface and will make it easier to glue to the wreath form.

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Step 4:
Glue circles (or other shapes) to the centers of the circles on the decorated side of the rosette.

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Step 5:
Arrange rosettes around wreath form and glue into place. If you want to make smaller rosettes, cut the paper into 1″ x 12″ strips.

Step 6:
Tie on ribbon and enjoy your new wreath!

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For more inspiration on paper crafting, check out these books:
Sweet Paper Crafts by Mollie Greene
Beautiful Paper Cutting

And check out our calendar for upcoming craft workshops!

You can Fax at the Library

Did you know that you can fax papers at the library? It only costs $1 per page and is available at each branch (international faxes are priced differently). You can also receive faxes at the library- incoming faxes are also just $1 per page.

Fax is short for facsimile and faxes work by sending an image over a phone network.

Here’s a short history of the fax machine:

The fax machine was invented before the telephone. Alexander Bain, a clockmaker, was most likely the first person to invent this technology. He managed to send an image over a wire, however, the quality was not great. He patented his idea on May 27, 1843.

Other forms of the fax machine were invented starting around 1865. But the Xerox Corporation is credited with inventing the modern fax machine. Today’s fax machines work by using a photo sensor to look at the paper it’s copying and sending. The photo sensor is able to see the difference between the light and dark areas. It then tells a computer processor how to reproduce the image at a distance location by encoding the information. The encoding is what enables the machine to send the information along by phone line or over the internet (JMRL uses dedicated phone lines to send a fax). At the receiving fax machine, the machine reads the encoded information and remakes the image.

In 1989 there were over 10 million fax machines in the world, today there aren’t quite that many, but they are still in heavy use. Here’s an article  from the BBC about why the fax machine is still used today, even with all of our technology.

Visit your local library branch the next time you need to send a fax!

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JMRL staffer sending a fax